Greater accountability in nursing handover
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Keywords

nursing handover
professional ethics
social responsibility
accountability
patient care

How to Cite

Zolkefli, Y. (2022). Greater accountability in nursing handover. Belitung Nursing Journal, 8(1), 84–85. https://doi.org/10.33546/bnj.1966
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Abstract

Nursing handover exemplifies both the nurse’s professional ethics and the profession’s integrity. The article by Yetti et al. acknowledges the critical role of structure and process in handover implementation. At the same time, they emphasised the fundamental necessity to establish and update handover guidelines. I assert that effective patient handover practices do not simply happen; instead, nurses require pertinent educational support. It is also pivotal to develop greater professional accountability throughout the handover process. The responsibility for ensuring consistent handover quality should be shared between nurse managers and those who do the actual handover practices.

https://doi.org/10.33546/bnj.1966
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Copyright (c) 2022 Yusrita Zolkefli

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

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Declaration of Conflicting Interest

The author declares that they have no conflict of interest in this study.

Acknowledgment

None.

Author’s Contribution

YZ is the sole author of the paper.

Data Availability

Not applicable.


References

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Bruton, J., Norton, C., Smyth, N., Ward, H., & Day, S. (2016). Nurse handover: Patient and staff experiences. British Journal of Nursing, 25(7), 386-393. https://doi.org/10.12968/bjon.2016.25.7.386

Burgess, A., van Diggele, C., Roberts, C., & Mellis, C. (2020). Teaching clinical handover with ISBAR. BMC Medical Education, 20(2), 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12909-020-02285-0

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Losfeld, X., Istas, L., Schoonvaere, Q., Vergnion, M., & Bergs, J. (2021). Impact of a blended curriculum on nursing handover quality: a quality improvement project. BMJ Open Quality, 10(1), e001024. http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjoq-2020-001024

Pun, J. (2021). Factors associated with nurses’ perceptions, their communication skills and the quality of clinical handover in the Hong Kong context. BMC Nursing, 20(1), 1-8. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12912-021-00624-0

Raeisi, A., Rarani, M. A., & Soltani, F. (2019). Challenges of patient handover process in healthcare services: A systematic review. Journal of Education and Health Promotion, 8, 173. https://doi.org/10.4103%2Fjehp.jehp_460_18

Yetti, K., Dewi, N. A., Wigiarti, S. H., & Warashati, D. (2021). Nursing handover in the Indonesian hospital context: Structure, process, and barriers. Belitung Nursing Journal, 7(2), 113-117. https://doi.org/10.33546/bnj.1293